Counting the Cost

Nov 28, 2015

Counting the Cost

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photo-1428196457394-f0c4aec5f574I am a Scot -I’m expected to be somewhat thrifty but we have a good saying…

“Thrift taken to the extreme is…meanness

I do not want to be mean…ever!

So, today I want to discuss what I hope is some very basic math and how to spend just a little time getting to know how to upgrade every single meal you will ever eat from now on.

Well, that may be an exaggeration but it worked for me.

It is true that I went from tenderloin steaks flamed in good brandy, drowned in double cream –all set up on a slice of bread sautéed in butter and spread thickly with goose liver pate and chopped truffles.

I left this kind of food behind and plunged into the wild and wonderful world of great plant foods plucked from the earth and delivered swiftly to the pan. Ah! What a change!

Now, of course, this is an over-dramatic example but it does serve to illustrate my purpose, which is to reduce (but not exclude entirely) some foods that may do harm if consumed in larger portions over long periods and partially replace them with a wide variety of mostly fresh plant foods.

I once called this “MiniMax” for minimal risk, maximum flavor. For me, it’s a definite UPGRADE that I obviously love to share!  

Because of my Scottish background I was fascinated that we were saving money and so I decided to find out how much that might be.

The past was gone in real numbers but I spent an hour in our local market pricing what we used to spend and then kept every single market receipt as we made our changes.

From these I was able to work out a monthly budget that I confirmed over two months.

These numbers were then compared with my estimated past and BINGO…I had a rough estimate.

For our family of four, during an October/November period (not hot but not cold) we had “saved” just on $80 a month or just under $1,000 for the year.

That was the moment we decided to use half of those savings to upgrade our meal with the most nourishing (and less risky) foods possible and then give the other half to those much less fortunate than ourselves.

Amazingly, those dollars and cents added up over time and our food budget has cost us just about $105,000 LESS!

This has allowed over $50,000 to be sent in support of those in much greater need.

For this, of course I am hugely thankful both my beloved’s better health for her last 28 years and for those we have helped. It has truly been a Double Benefit.

Such is Thanksgiving?

7 Comments

  1. Mike Fenwick Says: November 29, 2015 1:53 pm

    Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family, Mr. Kerr! May God bless you abundantly!

  2. Gary & Karen Parnell Says: December 3, 2015 7:24 pm

    We are reading, thinking,’swimming’ up stream. Thanks for the inspiration, for a meaningful and healthier life. With help from God’s love, there is hope for success.

  3. Gary & Karen Parnell Says: December 4, 2015 6:13 pm

    We are reading, thinking,’swimming’ up stream. Thanks for the inspiration, for a meaningful and healthier life. With help from God’s love, there is hope for success.

  4. Jean N Sozio Says: December 22, 2015 4:05 am

    I wish there was a way to make healthy organic food more affordable for those less able to stretch or even form a budget. The cost of nuts and free range eggs for example is outrageous. Also, I think the microwave oven (much as I love mine) has been a significant cause in the rise of obesity. It’s to easy to “nuke” a quick bowl of calories, many times over, than to take the time and energy to actually cook and do the dishes!

  5. Jean N Sozio Says: December 22, 2015 4:07 am

    I wish there was a way to make healthy organic food more affordable for those less able to stretch or even form a budget. The cost of nuts and free range eggs for example is outrageous. Also, I think the microwave oven (much as I love mine) has been a significant cause in the rise of obesity. It’s to easy to “nuke” a quick bowl of calories, many times over, than to take the time and energy to actually cook and do the dishes! We need more folks like you teaching people to appreciate good food and how to cook for their families and pass on wonderful traditions of home and love and resilience.

  6. Jean N Sozio Says: December 27, 2015 4:21 am

    What is your take on the now notion of “healthy fats” including coconut oil and butter – both saturated fats. Or processed oils (canola) vs pure oils (corn and olive). For my first 54 years I ate canola oil, soybean oil (margarine), yogurt, and grapefruit and walked daily – maintained low cholesterol and healthy weight but developed breast and uterine cancer. Praise the Lord He has spared my life twice. 6 years ago I switched to butter, olive oil, coconut oil, and Greek yogurt – have gained 110 pounds and developed gout, osteoarthritis, and possibly angina. I went from a protein rich diet to a carb rich diet. I prefer heart disease over cancer but not stroke. Which way to go? Should we make food choices dependent on the disease by which we are most comfortable enduring?

  7. Stephen Says: February 9, 2016 5:51 am

    i have acid reflux and i remembered your minimax book and show and thought i trace it down ( because you still want tasty healthy food right?) which brought me here. Your sunny personality has always brought me joy. I appreciate your efforts always.

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